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HSBC UK to end its sponsorship with British Cycling

British Cycling announced last week that HSBC UK is going to end its sponsorship with the federation following this Olympic Games cycle. In a press statement, HSBC UK has decided to launch a break clause in which was an eight-year partnership agreement because of a shift in UK marketing and partnership priorities.

Julie Harrington, chief executive of British Cycling, said that they will part with HSBC UK as firm friends and meanwhile, look forward to working with them to support their riders to achieve their best in Tokyo 2020 Olympics.

The bank and British Cycling started their partnership with in 2016 by an eight-year agreement with one of the targets getting two million people cycling by the end of 2020.

According to a press release, there have been 525,000 people taking part in HSBC UK Go Ride, HSBC UK Breeze, HSBC UK Ready Set Ride, and HSBC UK Let’s Ride in 2019.

In the last two decades, British Cycling was among the most successful cycling countries in the world with great riders including Olympic gold medalists Jason Kenny and Laura Kenny, two former road race world champions Lizzie Deignan and Mark Cavendish, and former Tour de France winners Chris Froome, Bradley Wiggins, and Geraint Thomas.

However, British Cycling has recently been involved in two on-going and highly-publicized cases at the General Medical Council (GMC) and the employment tribunal. 

Moreover, there have been repeated delays to decide whether former Team Sky and British Cycling doctor Richard Freeman is fit or not to practice medicine. He accepted 18 of the 22 allegations but disputed the delivery of testosterone to British Cycling HQ and Team Sky that same year.

As a reason for the sponsorship loss, British Cycling did not mention either case. However, it showed clearly that HSBC UK decided to exercise a break clause due to a shift in UK marketing and partnership priorities.

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News

58% of UK residents support the government to spend more on cycling infrastructure

A new report published today (March 4) by walking and cycling charity Sustrans suggests the bulk of UK residents support efforts to scale back car use and believe that the government should make it as easy as possible for people to cycle.

In the present, road transport accounts for 27% of the greenhouse emission in the UK with the most source being private vehicles.

According to a survey that was conducted on more than 16,900 UK residents, 58% of them agreed that there should be more investment in cycling than driving.

Currently, there are only 50 miles of protected cycle tracks within the UK, as compared, Copenhagen, with a population of 1.3 million has 237 miles of protected cycle tracks.

The survey also revealed that one in two residents agreed with the statement that there are too many of us driving in their area. 59% agreed that reducing road traffic would make their area a far better place to measure and work.

56% of these surveyed were also in support of the thought to charge polluting vehicles to enter the town if the financial proceeds are then wont to fund conveyance, walking, and cycling services.

Director of urbanism at Sustrans Daisy Narayanan said that the climate crisis is the 21st century’s greatest environmental and health challenge.

‘With road transport being one among the main sources of greenhouse gasses and air pollutants, it’s time we end car-centric planning which has shaped our cities and towns for many years and reprioritize our streets towards people.

‘Many cities are taking action to scale back car trips and make it more convenient for people to steer and cycle. Our report shows the general public is supportive of those plans.

‘Ahead of crucial climate talks at COP26 in Glasgow, we urge the united kingdom Government to point out leadership and make a step-change in investment for cycling and walking, including protected cycle lanes, and adopt policies to support more people to modify from driving to walking and cycling for shorter journeys.’

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Blog

Laura Kenny’s dream of winning three medals at the Tokyo Olympics Games in doubt since cyclist is only passed fit for one event at the World Championships next week

Laura Kenny‘s dream of winning 3 gold medals at the 2020 Tokyo Olympics Games is in doubt after she was only passed fit for oneevent at the track cycling World Championships next week.

The most successful female Olympian of Great Britain broke a shoulder as she crashed at a World Cup event in Canada last month.

Kenny, 27, avoided surgery so she might be selected for the omnium in Berlin next week, but she is going to sit out the team pursuit and therefore the madison.

And that has put her on the rear foot before the Games in July, where she hopes to require her gold tally to seven — quite any Briton has won.

Kenny won gold within the team pursuit and individual omnium at London 2012 and Rio 2016. Tokyo are going to be the primary time the two-person madison has been a part of the women’s track cycling schedule for the Olympics and Kenny is one among four Great Britain girls competing for an area .

While Kenny remains likely to be selected within the team pursuit for Tokyo if fit, her chances of competing within the madison now look slim, especially if Barker and Evans perform well in Berlin.

In the men’s team, the rising star Ethan Hayter of Great Britain has also been dealt a blow in his bid to ride all three events at the Olympics.

He has been selected for the team pursuit at the planet Championships, which can be spearheaded by veteran three-time Olympic champion Ed Clancy, also because the madison with Ollie Wood.

But Hayter has been overlooked for the omnium in favour of Matt Walls despite winning bronze within the event eventually year’s World Championships in Poland.

British Cycling selectors don’t need to decide which riders will race during which events until they’re actually call at Tokyo.

But cyclists view the choice for the planet Championship as a serious indicator into their chances of being picked for events at the Games.

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UK's cycling routes

Best cycling routes in the UK (part 1)

Whether cycling is your thing, getting on your bike is a beautiful and healthy way to explore the British Isles. And if you’re concerned about the nation’s steep hills, why not cheat a bit by riding a proper leg-powered cycle. There are a lot of fantastic cycle routes to explore in the UK. Here are ten of them:

The Camel Trail, Cornwall

The Camel Trail, which is the most popular tourist cycle route in the UK, attracts 350,000 cyclists every year. It is a 17-mile route next to the River Camel from Poley’s Bridge to Padstow, through Bodmin and Wadebridge. It’s perfect for younger kids riding their bikes or sitting in trailers, and while riding both ways, you can just ride from Wadebridge to Padstow and back, a 12-mile round trip.

Hartington, Peak District

The village of Hartington gives easy access to three excellent old railway paths: the High Peak Trail (17.5 miles), the Tissington ​Trail (13 miles) and the Manifold Way (8.5 miles). In spite of the Peak District hills, cuttings and embankments keep these trails almost flat, though the High Peak is exposed in places. YHA Hartington Hall, a 17th -century manor house, is a nice place to stop for families, and Alton Towers theme park is nearby.

Mawddach Trail, North Wales

The Mawddach Estuary is very beautiful, with watercolor Welsh hills heaped up above a peaceful estuary. The trip from Barmouth to Dolgellau is about 11 miles each way, almost along an old railway path. If you Are here for a few days, the off-road trails of Coed y Brenin are nearby.

The Cuckoo Trail, Sussex

An 11-mile route is from Heathfield to Polegate, with an onward link to Eastbourne. It runs through farmland and woodland, with amazing sculptures On route. Once again, it follows the route of a dismantled railway, making it a good option for children on their own bikes.

Putney Bridge to Weybridge, London, and Surrey

Yes, touring in London. Escape the hurly-burly of the capital into peaceful greenery. This 18-mile route runs mostly on riverside paths alongside the Thames and takes in Richmond Park, too. If you want a shorter option, ride from Kingston Upon Thames, which is 9 miles from Weybridge.