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Tour de France rescheduled to August because of Covid-19 pandemic

Tour de France, the world’s leading road bike race, has been rescheduled to August this year, due to the effects of the Covid-19 epidemic. The original schedule of the Grand Tour on French soil this year was from June 27 until July 19. Meanwhile, the reorganized schedule will take place from August 29 until September 20 this year.

The reschedule of Tour de France 2020

Currently, France is still one of many countries in Europe that are executing orders to close and isolate society when more than 15,000 people die of corona virus. In this situation, many people are concerned that the Tour de France – a “sports icon” of France – will not take place in 2020.

However, when decided to reschedule the Tour de France schedule. By August, Director Prudhomme believed that this was originally a sign that France in particular, and the world in general, was gradually recovering from the threat of the Covid-19 pandemic.

The UCI World Tour 2020 is currently heavily affected by the Covid-19 epidemic. While the organizers of the Giro d’Italia (Grand Tour in Italy) have not yet made an official decision on the fate of this year’s tournament, that the tournament will be canceled or rescheduled like the Grand Tour in France, the tournament.

Tour de France will take place 2 months later than the original schedule and plan. Historically, there has never been a tournament taking place at such a late time, but this year’s tournament will be postponed and will take place from August 29 until September 20 this year.

The Grand Tour in Spain – Vuetla a Espana, and the UCI World Road Bikes Tournament (to be held in Martigny – Switzerland) are still “motionless”.

The thing is, with the Tour de France moving to August and September, both of these tournaments will be greatly affected, as Vuelta a Espana 2020 is scheduled to take place from August 14 to September 6, while the World Championship expected to take place from September 20 to September 27.

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Blog

The demand for bicycles significantly increases (Part 1)

The deserted roads, the feeling of footsteps and the fear of Covid-19 infection when using public transport in Europe and the United States have created a launch pad for the soaring demand for bicycles.

Many people ride the streets of Dublin, Ireland. The Covid-19 pandemic has boosted demand for bicycles in Europe and the US.

Covid-19 opened up growth opportunities for the bicycle market and brought great rewards to Taiwan, the world’s leading bicycle manufacturer. Thanks to the early control of the Covid-19 pandemic, Taiwan did not have to completely blockade, so production activities were not affected. Currently, Taiwanese factories are racing to find parts to meet busy bicycle orders.

The demand for bicycle significantly increased thanks to COVID-19 pandemic

At Giant, the largest bicycle company in the world, its production and business activities in the past few months have been extremely busy.

Orders continue to rise, dealers report out of car and new queue status takes place throughout Europe and North America. In the UK, the Bicycle Business Association says about 20,000 vehicles are pending production and deliveries have been sold or reserved. Buyers of many components, some people have always ridden to work before, some have never ridden a bike…

Sales of commuter bicycles and sport bicycles rose 66% in March, promenade bicycles jumped 121% and electric bicycles increased 85%, according to market research firm The NPD Group.

According to Giant CEO Bonnie Tu, demand in the US and Europe is focused on bikes that cost $ 1,000 or less.

Chicago police, USA, ride a bicycle while following protest groups during the Covid-19 season.

Giant’s plants in Taiwan are still operating, but many of their facilities in China were temporarily closed when the corona virus originated in Wuhan. The 100% production recovery was delayed due to problems with sourcing parts from suppliers.

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Around cycling

Cycling in the UK in the midst of COVID-19 pandemic (Part 2)

Except for the convenience of avoiding Covid-19, British residents also find cycling to work as well as exercise, health promotion during isolation.

As a result, they became increasingly fond of bicycles. Many optimists believe that even at the end of the pandemic, UK road traffic will not return to the situation of cars, many congestion as before.

Expand the trend to other European countries

After the UK, many other European countries also encourage residents to switch to cycling. In Germany, people extend the bike lane, marked by lines and signs. In France, Paris has deployed an additional 650 km of “corona bicycles”. Particularly Milan (Italy) also established some routes only for permanent bicycles.

In addition to bicycles, in the UK, there is another means of transport suddenly taking the throne is the tram. In the past, they were often banned from running on public roads and sidewalks because of the danger. During the quarantine period, electric vehicle sales in the UK doubled compared to last year.

In the first week of May 2020, Pure Electric, Somerset electric retailer, consumed 135 units / day. Meanwhile, last year, the total sales were 11,500 units (an average of 31 units / day).

Although bicycles and trams are convenient during the quarantine period, campaigners who switch to bicycles are still worried about traffic safety. In 2019, television host Emily Hartridge (35) was killed in an accident while riding a streetcar in south London.

The current concern in the UK is road safety for bicyclists. The government has to deal with bad roads, potholes, and bicyclists are self-protective with protective accessories such as helmets, knee belts, elbows, etc.

As can be seen, cycling is still one of the most popular choices of people in the UK in the midst of Covid-19 pandemic. This means of transportation promised to be a good solution while the public transportation is not in use due to the pandemic.

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Blog

The UK Bicycle team sponsors water for National Health Service staff

The UK Bicycle team has sponsored 800 national team drinking water bottles for employees of the National Health Service in the United Kingdom.

The bottles will be sent to National Health Service staff in Hull and York to partly support and motivate this force during the Covid-19 pandemic. The water supply plants had to be removed from some hospitals were affected by the pandemic, and this has affected many health workers, who spend long hours in personal protective equipment, causing them to sweat and dehydrate.

The sponsorship of the drinking water campaign is currently run by Matt Porter, the owner of the company, which organizes Sportive HQ cycling events, along with sponsoring drinking water from many other companies and groups. All proceeds will be used to purchase more bottles of drinking water.

UK Bicycle Team leader, Nick Hayes, expressed his delight when partnering with partners HSBC UK and SiS to provide some support to the National Health Service staff who are fighting Tireless to keep us safe during this time. On behalf of the British Bicycle team, Nick Hayes sent to the National Health Service staff thanks for the admirable work.

Olympic Lake Placid venues will support health professionals

The Olympic venues at Lake Placid have been repurposed to support the medical staff currently involved in the Covid pandemic. 19. Herb Brooks Arena is a complex area where competition content will be organized. on the ice will be along with a number of other locations such as Madison Square Garden and the world’s number one Trade Center will become part of the fight against Covid 19 in New York.

New York City was the worst hit by this pandemic when it hit the United States. More than 8,600 people died, an even greater number than those killed in the painful November 9 event. 181,000 cases of Covid 19 have made New York the city with the number of infected people even more than some other countries in the world.

Lake Placid twice hosted the Winter Olympics, first in 1932 and then in 1980. Herb Brooks Arena is named after the late coach of the male hockey team of America (consisting of college football player, famously defeated the Soviet Union to fully conquer ice hockey in 1980).