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Around cycling

How do developed countries encourage people to use bicycles? (Part 1)

Due to the increasing traffic pressure in urban areas, bicycles are considered as one of the effective solutions to solve the problem of congestion and air pollution.

Netherlands

The number of bicycles in the Netherlands is more than the population. The number of bicycles in the Netherlands is 23 million, out of a total of 17 million people.

The number of bicycles in cities always accounts for over 70% of vehicles. This achievement is thanks to reasonable policies, tireless efforts, and above all the love for bicycles as well as the consciousness and spirit of the Dutch people.

With 17 million people and 23 million bicycles, the Netherlands is a rare country with more bicycles than people. The government hopes to increase the number of bicycle highways as well as encourage more people to use bicycles to work.

According to the Dutch Ministry of Water and Infrastructure Management, 15 routes will be developed into “bicycle highways” (bicycle-only roads), 25,000 bicycle parking lots will be erected, and more than 60 facilities. Bicycle storage will be upgraded to accomplish this goal.

Many Dutch people already love using bicycles for daily activities. According to the Dutch Institute of Policy Analysis, in 2016, more than a quarter of all Dutch trips were made by bicycle.

The Dutch government encourages to use bicycles to go to work, school and other daily activities

Of these, 25% of trips are by bicycle for business purposes, while 37% are for relaxation. The remaining trips are for going to school, shopping, and other activities.

According to Stientje van Veldhoven, more than 50% of the Dutch population lives less than 15km from the workplace, and more than half of the car journey to and from the workplace is made under 7.5km.

In order to encourage people to reduce car use, the Dutch government also spent money on this ideal plan. Accordingly, the Netherlands currently has a policy of rewarding bicyclists with a tax credit of US $ 0.22/km.

The company and its employees will confirm the distance an employee has cycled to work. However, this benefit is currently less known, and not many companies support it.

The Dutch government hopes to change this situation by promoting the program more effectively and promoting more partnerships. There are a number of major companies in the Netherlands committed to taking measures, such as funding bicycles for employees.