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UK's cycling routes

Best cycling routes in the UK (part 2)

Taff Trail, South Wales

This is a 55-mile largely traffic-free route from the center of Cardiff up to Brecon, passing Pontypridd and Merthyr Tydfil on the way. You don’t need to cycle both ways because the Brecon Bike Bus connects Cardiff and Brecon on Sundays between May and August. Sustrans’ Lon Las Cymru South map covers the Taff Trail and more.

Bealach Na Ba Circuit, North West Scotland

Explore the Applecross Penninsula, which is simply across the ocean from Skye. Cycle clockwise from Shieldaig, taking in Britain’s most spectacular road and only alpine style climb – that you’ll need very low gears. The 43-mile circuit might be wiped out each day by fit families with tandems or teenagers, otherwise you could camp or B&B in Applecross.

The South Downs Way, Southern England

A 100-mile off-road chalk hills trail between Winchester and Beachy Head. It’s not technically demanding in mountain biking terms but it does require an honest level of fitness to try to to the entire thing. Allow three or four days, or simply do bits of it.

Land’s End to John o’ Groats

Land’s End to John o’ Groats

Ok this is not for beginners, but it gives you something to aim for and you’ll roll in the hay in small sections because it is Britain’s ultimate big ride. Most of the people take three weeks to cycle a scenic 1,000-mile route from the tip of Cornwall to the highest of Scotland, covering around 50 miles each day. Children as young as nine have ridden this on their own bikes, but it’ll be easier with tandems, or older children. Cycling UK have an End to finish information pack, which is out there liberal to members and there’s a superb Land’s End to John o’Groats section on the Cycling UK Forum, it’s full of advice from many cyclists who have cycled the top to finish and may be a excellent spot to ask questions.

Categories
UK's cycling routes

Best cycling routes in the UK (part 1)

Whether cycling is your thing, getting on your bike is a beautiful and healthy way to explore the British Isles. And if you’re concerned about the nation’s steep hills, why not cheat a bit by riding a proper leg-powered cycle. There are a lot of fantastic cycle routes to explore in the UK. Here are ten of them:

The Camel Trail, Cornwall

The Camel Trail, which is the most popular tourist cycle route in the UK, attracts 350,000 cyclists every year. It is a 17-mile route next to the River Camel from Poley’s Bridge to Padstow, through Bodmin and Wadebridge. It’s perfect for younger kids riding their bikes or sitting in trailers, and while riding both ways, you can just ride from Wadebridge to Padstow and back, a 12-mile round trip.

Hartington, Peak District

The village of Hartington gives easy access to three excellent old railway paths: the High Peak Trail (17.5 miles), the Tissington ​Trail (13 miles) and the Manifold Way (8.5 miles). In spite of the Peak District hills, cuttings and embankments keep these trails almost flat, though the High Peak is exposed in places. YHA Hartington Hall, a 17th -century manor house, is a nice place to stop for families, and Alton Towers theme park is nearby.

Mawddach Trail, North Wales

The Mawddach Estuary is very beautiful, with watercolor Welsh hills heaped up above a peaceful estuary. The trip from Barmouth to Dolgellau is about 11 miles each way, almost along an old railway path. If you Are here for a few days, the off-road trails of Coed y Brenin are nearby.

The Cuckoo Trail, Sussex

An 11-mile route is from Heathfield to Polegate, with an onward link to Eastbourne. It runs through farmland and woodland, with amazing sculptures On route. Once again, it follows the route of a dismantled railway, making it a good option for children on their own bikes.

Putney Bridge to Weybridge, London, and Surrey

Yes, touring in London. Escape the hurly-burly of the capital into peaceful greenery. This 18-mile route runs mostly on riverside paths alongside the Thames and takes in Richmond Park, too. If you want a shorter option, ride from Kingston Upon Thames, which is 9 miles from Weybridge.

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News

British Cycling announce changes to women’s classifications for 2020

British Cycling have announced new women’s classifications for 2020 to improve the consistency of events on the calendar, after having sought the views of hundreds of female riders to improve the structure of domestic racing.

Changes will come into effect for the 2020 road season, involving the introduction of the same categorisation used in men’s racing.

British Cycling’s cycle sport manager, Lisa Graham, said that recent years have seen strong increases in the amount of women taking up racing, and while they are absolutely delighted with this rise, they recognized the need to ensure that women’s racing environment continued to improve, and that they didn’t rest on their laurels.

“We introduced the Women’s Road Racing Workgroup in autumn 2018 to make sure that the voices of these women were heard, and one of the most consistent feedback themes we received was the need to alter the way women’s races were categorized.

“We are delighted that, after many months of work alongside riders, event organisers and others, we can bring about these changes for the 2020 season, and look forward to working with the Women’s Road Racing Workgroup to continue to bring about positive change.”

Races categorized as National A will be open to senior, elite, and junior first, second and third category riders with a minimum distance of 100km, or 70km per stage in a multi-day race.

National B events will be open to the same riders but with a minimum distance of 80km.

Senior and junior second, third and fourth category riders can enter Regional A races, which must have a minimum distance of 70km.

Regional B races will have a minimum distance of 60km and will be open to senior and junior third and fourth category riders, while Regional C/C+ events are open to all and have no minimum distance.

Ranking points for female riders will be the same as in the men’s model and both genders will be ranked in the same way.

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The Cycle Summit 2020

Yorkshire to host the CycleSummit 2020

Harrogate may be unlikely to host the UCI cycling championships again any time soon – or the Tour de Yorkshire – but it will certainly host another major cycling event next year, it was announced today.

The town has now been confirmed as the host location for the CycleSummit 2020 – an annual conference that brings together some of the biggest names in the cycle tourism industry.

It will be the first time in its 11-year history that Great Britain has been chosen to host this prestigious event.

The summit will take place between 10-13 October and is expected to attract delegates from right across the globe. The 2019 event, for instance, was held in Nyborg, Denmark and 75 cycle tour operators from 25 countries were involved.

Yorkshire was selected as a direct result of Cycle England’s success in championing the county as a world-class cycle tourism destination in key foreign markets.

Harrogate will be the main destination town for the summit and participants will visit other parts of the county during the four-day event, with many sets to extend their stay and sample other local attractions once the main conference has concluded.

Welcome to Yorkshire chair Peter Box said: “Yorkshire has shown time and again just what a fantastic location it is for hosting major conferences and events, and we’re thrilled that CycleSummit 2020 will be taking place in our county.

“The event will allow us to showcase Yorkshire as a world-class cycling destination once again and we’re confident it will lead to more cycle tour operators across the globe highlighting the county as an amazing place to visit.”

CycleSummit Project Manager managing director Heiko Riekenberg said: “We’re delighted to be bringing CycleSummit 2020 to Yorkshire, and from visiting the county in preparation for the event, we know this going to be a very special summit.

“Our event combines networking, workshops and a B2B marketplace, and we always look to host it in an interesting and inspiring cycling destination.

“Yorkshire certainly ticks those boxes and we couldn’t wish for a more suitable host town than Harrogate to base ourselves during the summit.”